Discover_Tasty_Recipes_for_Sales_Success_in_2015

 

For roughly 70% of sellers, 2015 starts in under five weeks.  Fresh start, right?  Would it surprise you that the majority of sellers feel more apprehensive than excited?  Fresh start, my eye.  What’s up with that? 

 

The root issue was identified by SBI research.  A whopping 78% of companies have the wrong Sales strategy.  And bad strategy adversely affects salespeople’s livelihoods.  

 

During the holiday season, many of us enjoy meals featuring game birds.  Our (un-)feathered friends provide a whimsical frame for exploring this issue. 

 

First item on our menu is…

 

Goose  

 

Consider the short tenure of the average VP of Sales.  Execute the wrong strategy and your goose is cooked.  Ok, sure, but how is this a salesperson’s problem?     

 

Think about what triggers executive turnover.  Lack of sales success.  But by the time a leader feels the flames, salespeople have already been burned.      

 

What can a salesperson working in a company with an ineffective Sales strategy do?  You could…

 

Duck  

 

In my previous blog, we met the human ATM.  His company sets quotas via the peanut-butter spread method.  So if he blows out 2014, he knows he’ll have to duck in 2015.  His standard play is to duck out—to a new job (or a new company).  

 

What do top companies do differently?  (Answer:  Almost everything!)  For example, they apply quantitative account segmentation.  They create balanced territories, set equitable quotas, and write great comp plans.  These secrets—and many more—are revealed in our report.

 

Many salespeople accept poor Sales strategy as unavoidable.  That condones the company treating you like a…

 

Turkey

 

In the USA, turkey is slang for “bad idea” and “fool.”  Enough said.  So let’s flip the script.  In 10-pin bowling, turkey means “three strikes in a row.”  The right sales strategy makes it easier for sellers to roll strikes.  Score a turkey, don’t be one.  Make your leaders aware of material that can help them help you.

 

Sellers routinely ask me why bad strategy persists.  Why don’t Sales Leaders act?  You might conclude they are…

 

Chicken  

 

There is no question that fear (technically, loss aversion) drives many Sales Leaders.  

 

But let’s be fair:

 

  • If it were easy to construct great strategy, everyone would do it.
    • Then there would be no advantage in it.
    • Which means there would be no such thing as great strategy. Zen, huh?

     

  • Human nature—especially fueled by fear—drives status quo bias.
  • When so few competitors have the right strategy, the urgency seems lower.

 

Okay, then what is a top-class Sales strategy like?

 

Turducken

 

What the heck is Turducken?  It’s a culinary masterpiece:  A chicken cooked inside a duck inside a turkey.  Don’t believe me?  Look it up!  It’s decadent; but like creating the right Sales strategy, it requires some engineering.   

 

Our research lays out a “Turducken” roadmap.  Share it with your leaders lest their strategy proves to be “for the birds.”  Then you won’t feel the urge to fly the coop.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kevin Avery

Challenges clients to design and implement innovative practices.
Learn more about Kevin Avery >

Prior to SBI, Kevin held leadership positions in sales, marketing, business and channel development in the high tech industry, concentrating in the Contact Center and Collaboration software.

 

Kevin was an A-Player salesperson who transitioned successfully into leadership. At Cisco Systems, his Enterprise Area sales team drove double-digit growth, with annual bookings exceeding $120MM. As Strategy leader for Cisco’s Contact Center and Collaboration specialist sales groups, he devised, designed and coached a competitive displacement sales program that netted over $125MM bookings with a 90% win rate and zero no-decisions. Kevin’s experience prior to Cisco at Spanlink – a packaged and custom software company and reseller-integrator – began at near-startup stage. Leading the sales team out of the company’s IPO, he grew revenues by 50%, then closed an OEM agreement with a $70M+ lifetime value. When the 2001 tech bubble burst, resulting in dissolving a $130M acquisition, he was instrumental in refitting and relaunching the company.

 

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