The CEO called for organizational changes in the company. Now it’s time to communicate why the change happened, and maintain a positive culture. Savvy change management is key to get employee buy-in after a major organizational switch. Whether or not you will make your number rests heavily on your success after this organizational switch. It’s difficult to grow revenue faster than your industry’s growth rate and faster than your competitors. Leverage the How to Make Your Number in 2018 Workbook to access a revenue growth methodology to hit your number quarter after quarter, and year after year. 

 

Assume Resistance to Change

Change is scary, especially if your business has always done things the same way. The sales team’s change management plan can be the template for other departments. Here are a few considerations to keep in mind when crafting a plan:

 

  • Assume resistance to change and identify major employee objections to organizational changes.
  • Focus on mitigating and addressing resistance to change.
  • Create a plan emphasizing the benefits of the change.
  • Bring clarity to a situation that has a significant amount of unknowns.
  • Empathize with employee concerns and engage with them to avoid active resistance.
  • Work with leaders to create a positive business culture for leaders and employees.

     

Leader Buy-In

 

Effective change management starts at the top. It’s impossible to promote a positive culture if managers doubt the benefits of organizational change. Meet with leaders to explain key points of the change and create transparent communication. The end goal is getting enthusiasm generated throughout the entire organization. Recruit leaders to keep an eye on their teams and identify major issues.

 

Build Trust in Employees for the Change

 

Avoid impersonal approaches to announcing major changes in the organization. Employees react with indifference at best and active resistance to the change at worst. Make the time to talk to employees in person.

 

A few strategies for building employee buy-in and trust includes:

 

  • Emphasizing their leaders are on-board with the changes.
  • Explain the direct employee benefits of the change.
  • Poll employees with internal surveys to build employee engagement with the change.
  • Directly work with employees to work through issues with the change.
  • Explain how the change is shaping the future of the business.
  • Detail how the change affects the employee’s day to day tasks.

     

Follow Through

 

Engagement surveys doesn’t amount to much if you don’t address their concerns. Show you care about employee concerns by adjusting your change management plan.

 

We know implementing effective change management in your business takes a significant amount of HR resources. We do the hard work of sifting through sales and marketing trends and strategies to bring you the most useful and relevant information.

 

Have expectations gone up and you might be wondering if you can make your number? Here is an interactive tool that will help you understand if you have a chance at success. Take the Revenue Growth Diagnostic test and rate yourself against SBI’s sales and marketing strategy to find out if:

  • Your revenue goal is realistic
  • You will earn your bonus
  • You will keep your job

 

 

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ted Grulikowski

Helping Companies Make their Number

With nearly 15 years of experience developing and executing innovative sales and marketing strategies, Ted has partnered with many of the most well respected brands in the world and a diverse mix of hundreds of SMB companies to produce remarkable results.

 

Ted has developed, launched, and led over 50 direct, indirect, inside, outside, and sales enablement teams across a wide range of industries, serving enterprise to SMB customers, domestic and globally. He has personally carried multi-million dollar sales quotas, led rapidly growing organizations, transformed under-performing teams, served on executive teams, developed long term strategic plans, managed capital investments, transformed demand generation approaches, revamped product strategies, negotiated global partnerships, instituted process discipline, and implemented the latest sales enablement technologies.

 

As a result, Ted understands the real world complexities of driving lasting change in public and private companies. He provides a diverse understanding of how corporate, product, marketing, and sales strategies must align to produce consistent results.

 

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